Der Glanz der neuen Zeit
 - Fenja Lüders - PB

Bastei Lübbe
Saga
Hardcover
381 pages
Ages 16+
ISBN: 978-3-7857-2685-3
Release Date: 30.10.2020

The Splendour of a New Time

Europe‘s gate to the world, the alluring smell of coffee and a merchant’s daughter with big plans

The Speicherstadt, Hamburg: huge warehouses, sacks of coffee, the smell of the big wide world. A man’s world – in the early years of the century, at least. Young Mina Deharde has the coffee trade in her blood, and spends every spare minute at the offices of her father’s coffee company in the heart of the Speicherstadt. They both know that as a woman she cannot take over the company, and her father has no male heir. But Mina refuses to give up, and clings to her dreams against all the odds.

Hamburg in the 1920s. The coffee importing company Kopmann and Deharde has survived the war and the period of inflation, though it has been hit hard. Mina’s husband Frederik has returned from the war unscathed. He and Mina have been married for twelve years, and they have a ten-year-old daughter named Klara. But Mina’s father’s prediction – that Mina would learn to love her husband in time – has not come to pass. The couple actually go out of their way to avoid each other.

When her father becomes seriously ill, Mina is forced to choose: between duty and freedom, family and love. She starts conducting business herself in secret. But the Hanseatic merchants still subscribe to the idea that ‘a man’s word is as good as his bond’. Women don’t even enter the picture.

Mina can think of only one man who might be able to help her – her childhood friend Edo. She finds out that he didn’t return to New York after the war, and persuades him to come back and work for Kopmann and Deharde. She also files for divorce and takes over the running of the firm herself. Eventually, Mina becomes the first woman ever to be admitted to the coffee exchange.



Detailed English outline available of THE SCENT OF THE WIDE WORLD
Part 2 of the sweeping Speicherstadt saga transports readers back to the razzle-dazzle of the 1920s